We give because we have received

“What you sow is what you reap” — a common quote usually used by many either (1) to scare people out when they do something wrong or (2) comfort others when they do something good.  The line is used when we want to tell someone that “what you put your heart on, is exactly what your hands will receive in time”. It can also be  a little more like the famous golden rule: “do unto others what you would have them do unto you”.

The phrase can also be associated with the word “investment” which means: putting something with an expectation to receive a gain. If you sow ‘big”,  you will reap ‘big’; or  the concept of the direct relationship between risk and return: the higher the risk, the higher the return.

In a biblical context (see Galatians6:7-9), such is regarded as the writer’s encouragement specifically to bless the servants of the Gospel (c.ref.v7b) and generally to be good not just to the teachers but for everybody of course (c.ref.v9). And we should do it untiringly, because sometimes it just gets harder.

One afternoon, I was just sitting on the floor, staring at my wall, with my thoughts playing around the topic above. Oh so emo! But I have seen a different perspective not on the “application” part; but on the “reason-WHY-I-should-be-untiringly-good” part.

I will give not for the goal of receiving something in return! I will love not because I want to be loved back! I will work hard not for the benefits that I would get. I will do something for the Lord not because I want to gain His favor.

Instead,

I will give because I have been blessed. I will love because I have been loved (We love because he first loved us” -1John4:19). I will work hard because I have been given strength (He gives strength to the weary and increases the power of the weak-Isaiah40:29).  I will work for the Lord because I have effortlessly gained His favor already (But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us-Romans 5:8).

What have you been sowing? The next question is: Why?